The Chicago Reporter

Red Line closure will hit local businesses, employees hard

By: 
Kyla Gardner | The Chicago Reporter

The Chicago Transit Authority says its spring 2013 closure of nine Red Line stations – from Cermak/Chinatown to 95th/Dan Ryan – will create hundreds of jobs for construction workers and bus drivers. But what it’s not talking about is the impact this five-month project will have on the workers who earn their livings near the... 

Undocumented Life: Fraud complaints against prominent immigration activist pile up

By: 
Maria Zamudio | The Chicago Reporter

The number of undocumented immigrants accusing a prominent immigration activist of scamming them out of thousands of dollars by pretending to be an immigration lawyer keeps growing. 

Terrill Swift's experience as a 17-year old shows how Illinois could lead nation in overturned convictions

By: 
The Chicago Reporter

You can deny the crime and die in jail with a 100-year sentence. Or you can cooperate and go home tonight.

Those were the options laid out for then-17-year-old Terrill Swift in 1994, after being accused of the rape and murder of 30-year-old Nina Glover in Englewood.

After hours of interrogation and ultimatums, Swift signed a full confession for a crime he didn’t commit.

The original occupation: Ex-Republic Windows and Doors workers start cooperative

By: 
Yana Kunichoff | The Chicago Reporter

Before there was Occupy Wall Street or Occupy Chicago, a group of 250 workers in Chicago decided to occupy the factory they were working in as a protest to a planned closure. 

Number of the day: $3 million - what Chicago paid to defended CPD repeaters against alleged illegal searches

By: 
Yana Kunichoff | The Chicago Reporter

In a list of police misconduct, such as extended detention, malicious prosecution, false arrest and excessive force, illegal search may be among one of the lighter offenses. But it’s still an expensive one.

Illinois may kick families off welfare after three years

By: 
Megan Cottrell | The Chicago Reporter

What happens to a poor family when they get kicked off welfare? 3,000 Illinois families may find out as of July 1st if the state goes ahead with its proposal to cut the budget by reducing the time limit for receiving cash assistance from five years to just three. 

70 reports of police misconduct on Sunday at NATO protest, says National Lawyers Guild

By: 
Yana Kunichoff | The Chicago Reporter

Now that the barricades are cleared from the streets, downtown traffic has resumed its sluggish pace and thousands of workers in the loop no longer have an excuse to take a day off, what is the legacy of the massive Sunday protest that brought out an estimated 15,000 people?

Anti-NATO activists make the connection between military alliance and local immigration battles

By: 
Yana Kunichoff | The Chicago Reporter

What are the connections between the proposed immigration detention center in Crete, a small town just south of Chicago, and an international military alliance?

Lots, say a group of activists connecting the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to immigration issues in Chicago.

Proposed child care cuts to trigger downward spiral: "It put families like me and others in a deeper hole."

By: 
Megan Cottrell | The Chicago Reporter

Chalonda McIntosh doesn't often take the day off work. But she will tomorrow, when she'll head down to Springfield to protest cuts and funding shortages to the state's child care subsidy program for low-income families.

I talked to McIntosh back in November when I was doing a story about the lack of child care centers around the Cabrini-Green neighborhood where she lives. McIntosh sends her youngest son, Raleigh, to the St. Vincent DePaul’s child care center on North Halsted Street in Lincoln Park, and uses Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) vouchers to help her pay for it.

New EEOC guidelines on discrimination based on arrests, convictions bring hope to some communities

By: 
Yana Kunichoff | The Chicago Reporter

For the first time in 25 years, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission refined its guidelines on discrimination against people with arrest or conviction records.

The law already warned that making hiring decisions based on arrest records or criminal convictions "may, in some instances, violate the prohibition against employment discrimination."

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