Faith & Criminal Justice

faith-criminal-justice

The new concealed carry law bans loaded and concealed weapons in a number of places across Illinois, including hospitals, buses, polling places, schools, BUT not in churches and other houses of worship.

Over the past year, Community Renewal Society advocated for common-sense anti-trafficking gun measures. We are disappointed in the new concealed carry law enacted by the IL General Assembly because it lacks many safeguards.

We call upon the General Assembly to amend the new concealed carry law in order to declare places of worship, pastoral care, and religious instruction as “gun-free.” We ask for the same consideration as libraries, schools, hospitals, and casinos.

The arc of God’s reign bends toward justice. Join me in prayer as we continue this work.

Everyone in Springfield is talking about guns this spring. Most of the debate has been about a new conceal-and-carry bill, mandated by the Illinois Supreme Court, and a ban on assault weapons. But that's not enough. Illegal handguns account for most of the gun deaths--murder and suicide--in the United States.

Rev. Eddie Knox reflects on our mission to stop illegal hand guns from reaching our communities, like in the Pullman community where he serves as pastor, during CRS' Day of Faith at the Capitol.

We call upon all Illinois legislators to ensure that any gun legislation that is called for vote in the General Assembly include the following anti-trafficking measures: universal background checks, titling handguns, and reporting lost or stolen firearms.

Illinois ought to be a leader of national legal reforms that consider prostituted people as victims of human trafficking in need of services rather than as criminal offenders.

Once again this year, in the final days of the outgoing General Assembly, PCG is part of a coalition seeking to pass a bill legalizing medical marijuana in Illinois. We are very close to success, but the last votes are always the hardest to get. I put the chances at about 50-50.

Our purpose in holding the Robert B. Wilcox symposium “Serving Our Communities: Alternatives to Incarceration” last month was to bring forward a “new paradigm” for responding to low-level, non-violent offenders, especially those caught up in the failed, so-called “War on Drugs.”

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